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Below are all the articles contained in the latest issue of The Pink Humanist with links added.
If you have found The Pink Humanist a good read, please consider making a donation to its publisher to help keep it going.
  • All
  • 'Gay Cures'
  • Alan Turing
  • America
  • Australia
  • Bermuda,
  • David Walliams,
  • Equality
  • Homophobia
  • Homosexuality
  • Human Rights
  • Judaism,
  • Oscar Wilde
  • Peter Tatchell
  • Reparative Therapy
  • Steven Anderson,
  • Terry Sanderson
  • Transsexuals
  • Trump
  • The Commonwealth Secretariat has been presented with proposals to put LGBT+ equality on the agenda of the upcoming Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM), which will take place in the UK in April, according to human rights campaigner Peter Tatchell. Photo: Peter Tatchell Foundation CHOGM leaders have previously always refused
    Read More
    • Equality
    • Homophobia
    • Homosexuality
    • Human Rights
    • Peter Tatchell
  • SCOTT DOUGLAS JACOBSEN speaks to TERRY SANDERSON, President of the UK’s National Secular Society, who is undergoing treatment for cancer. The interview was first published by The Canadian Atheist last October, and is republished with consent. TERRY Sanderson is the President of the National Secular Society – a British campaigning organization
    Read More
    • Terry Sanderson
  •   ABOVE is one of a number of posters that began appearing in Australia last year as the country prepared to hold a plebiscite asking citizens whether or not to legalise gay marriage. The main campaigner against a yes vote was the Coalition for Marriage, which used outlandish scare tactics
    Read More
    • Australia
    • Homophobia
  • AMERICA’s Department of Health and Human Services announced the creation in January 2018 of a new and “dangerous” division of the Office of Civil Rights that will allow healthcare providers to deny care to LGBT people and pregnant women based on their religious beliefs. The office, according to a report
    Read More
    • America
    • Homophobia
    • Trump
  • IN JULY last year Israeli Rabbi Shmuel Eliyahu sparked outrage when he suggested that gay people were terrorists. He told Army Radio: “We will not allow Israel to become LGBTistan. There is LGBT terror, which forces the system to do what it views as being against healthy thinking. To say
    Read More
    • 'Gay Cures'
    • Homophobia
    • Homosexuality
    • Judaism,
    • Reparative Therapy
  • WHEN it was announced last year that a “secular temple” devoted to Oscar Wilde had opened in the basement of a New York church, the Telegraph reported that the project – 20 years in the making by American artists David McDermott and Peter McGough – had been created “to honour a trailblazer
    Read More
    • Alan Turing
    • Oscar Wilde
  • WHEN David Walliams – best known for his appearances in the TV show Little Britain and most recently as a judge on Britain’s Got Talent – published his first children’s book, The Boy in the Dress, in 2008 Christian reviewers lost no time on excoriating him for promoting transvestism and transgenderism. For
    Read More
    • David Walliams,
    • Homophobia
    • Transsexuals
  • IN AN astonishing about-turn, Bermuda – a British Overseas Territory – voted last December 13 to reverse gay marriage legislation just six months after the Supreme Court ordered the introduction same-sex unions. The Government replaced it with a Domestic Partnership Act. The reversal came after pressure was put on lawmakers by anti-gay
    Read More
    • Bermuda,
    • Homophobia
    • Homosexuality
  • PASTOR Steven Anderson, of Arizona’s Faithful Word Baptist Church – notorious for his aggressive incitements to anti-gay violence – was just about to travel to Jamaica when he got news on January 29 that officials has denied him entry. He had earlier announced that he would be travelling to Jamaica to recruit
    Read More
    • Homophobia
    • Steven Anderson,

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The Pink Humanist is a 16-page quarterly magazine launched by the PINK TRIANGLE TRUST in 2011 and edited by veteran gay journalist and photographer, Barry Duke, who lives in Benidorm on Spain's Costa Blanca.

The Pink Triangle Trust was established as a UK registered charity in 1992 – and is the only charity of its kind in the UK.

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Canadian court rules against biblical hate speech

The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that biblical speech opposing homosexual behavior, including in written form, is essentially a hate crime.

According to this report, the court upheld the conviction of Christian fundamentalist William Whatcott, who found himself in hot water after distributing flyers regarding the Bible’s prohibitions against homosexuality throughout the Saskatoon and Regina neighborhoods in 2001 and 2002.


The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that biblical speech opposing homosexual behavior, including in written form, is essentially a hate crime.

According to this report, the court upheld the conviction of Christian fundamentalist William Whatcott, who found himself in hot water after distributing flyers regarding the Bible’s prohibitions against homosexuality throughout the Saskatoon and Regina neighborhoods in 2001 and 2002.

 

One flyer that was found to be in violation stated, citing 1 Corinthians 6:9:

The Bible is clear that homosexuality is an abomination. Scripture records that Sodom and Gomorrah was given over completely to homosexual perversion and as a result destroyed by God’s wrath.

Another flyer, entitled Keep Homosexuality Out of Saskatoon’s Public Schools, was written in response to the recommendation of the Saskatoon School Board that the subject of homosexuality be included in school curriculum.

The Supreme Court declared the document to be unlawful because it called the homosexual acts that would be taught to children “filthy,” and contended that children are more interested in playing Ken and Barbie than:

Learning how wonderful it is for two men to sodomize each other.

The justices ruled that because the use of the word “sodomy” only referred to “two men” and not also the sex acts of heterosexuals, it was a direct target against a specific group of people.

Whatcott had distributed the flyers over a decade ago to raise awareness of his paranoia about both gayl parades in Canada, as well as the vulnerability of children in a culture that promotes homosexuality.

However, when Canada’s Human Rights Commission found out about the matter, they took him to court, citing him with a hate crime.

The Supreme Court noted in its opinion, among other concerns, that Whatcott’s use of the Bible to target homosexuals was a problem. It ruled:

[Whatcott's] expression portrays the targeted group as a menace that could threaten the safety and well-being of others, makes reference to respected sources (in this case the Bible) to lend credibility to the negative generalizations, and uses vilifying and derogatory representations to create a tone of hatred.

It pointed back to the lower court ruling, which asserted:

While the courts cannot be drawn into the business of attempting to authoritatively interpret sacred texts such as the Bible, those texts will typically have characteristics which cannot be ignored if they are to be properly assessed in relation to … the [Hate Crimes] Code.

The judges did note, however, that:

It would only be unusual circumstances and context that could transform a simple reading or publication of a religion’s holy text into what could objectively be viewed as hate speech.

Whatcott has now been ordered to pay $7,500 to two gay people who took offence at his flyers, as well as to pay the legal fees of the Human Rights Commission – which could cost him hundreds of thousands of dollars.

The bigot moaned:

The ruling and the reasoning [of the court] is terrible,. They actually used the concept that truth is not a defence.

He added:

It’s worse than I expected. What it means is that my life is over as I know it.

According to this report, Whatcott described the ruling as as "rubbish", and said the ruling criminalises a large part of Christian speech on homosexuality and morality.

Unapologetic, he suggested he may put out another flyer on expressing that viewpoint and it will be written in what he calls his usual blunt and forthright manner.

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